Dry Falls Visitor Center

In the heart of the Grand Coulee lies one of the natural wonders of North America—the Dry Falls cataract. This 3.5-mile-wide chasm of basalt, with a drop of 400 feet, was left high and dry thousands of years ago as the last of several Ice Age floods swept through the Grand Coulee. This is one of the most extraordinary landscapes to be found along the Ice Age Floods National Geologic Trail.

Enjoy the ActivitiesDry Falls
Begin your journey with a visit to the historic Vista House Overlook, which offers panoramic views of Dry Falls. Watch for wildlife, the plunge pools surrounding this dormant Ice Age waterfall are now home to a series of tranquil groundwater-fed lakes, an oasis for wildlife and wildlife viewing.

Dry Falls Visitor Center, Vista House overlook, parking lot rimmed in rock, blue sky, brown cliffs in background

The Visitor Center
Next door you will find the Dry Falls Visitor Center, which features indoor exhibits highlighting the Ice Age and early human history of the region. The center also features a comprehensive bookstore—a must stop for those looking to learn more about the Ice Age floods story.
Dry Falls Visitor Center
After visiting the center, explore the Dry Falls landscape by car, on foot, or by boat. Sun Lakes-Dry Falls State Park offers a wide variety of recreational opportunities, including hiking more than 15 miles of trails, interpretive programs, camping, boating, golfing, and wildlife viewing.

Admission
The Discover Pass is required for parking.
Admission into the center is free, with donations accepted.

Nearby Attractions
  • Sun Lakes-Dry Falls State Park:
    • Park Lake swim area
    • Umatilla Rock Trail
    • Deep Lake day-use area
    • Sun Lakes Resort
  • Lake Lenore Caves State Park, located 10 miles south on State Route 17
  • Steamboat Rock State Park, located 21 miles north on State Route 155
The Ice Age Floods in Washington
To learn more about the Ice Age floods in Washington, visit the Ice Age Floods Institute website.