Trail Signs

Weather conditions may cause trail markers to become obstructed and non-visible. Be prepared to backtrack if you can no longer see a trail.

Increased trail grooming and heavier use of trails have heightened the need for trail signage. For public safety, it is policy that no trail grooming may occur until a trail is adequately signed.

Learn to recognize these signs before you head out on the trails.

Snowmobile Trail Signs
Stop (red with white letters)
Stop Ahead (yellow with black letters)
Caution (yellow with black letters)
Snowmobile Trail Head Marker (brown with white symbol)
Snowmobile Trail Blazer (orange)
Cross-County Ski Trail Blazer (blue)
Directional Marker (orange with black symbol)
Right Intersection (yellow with black symbol)
Left Intersection (yellow with black symbol)
T Intersection (yellow with black symbol)
Crossroad (yellow with black symbol)
Designated Sno-Park (brown with white letters)
Cross-Country Ski Trail Signs
Cross-Country Ski Trail Head Marker (brown with white symbol)
Caution (red legend on yellow)
Do Not Enter (red legend on white)
Directional Marker (blue with black symbol)
One Way (black legend on white)
Easiest Trail (green legend on white)
More Difficult Trail (blue legend on white)
Most Difficult Trail (black legend on white)
Cross-County Ski Trail Blazer (blue)
Groomed Trail Permit (brown with white letters)
Designated Sno-Park (brown with white letters)
Wilderness Area Trail Signs
National Forest Wilderness
Mule Deer Winter Range
Big Game Winter Range
Lynx Habitat